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Kids Toothpaste, Toothbrushes, and More


Registered on 2016. 06. 21


Toothpastes

So many toothpastes are on the market today, choosing one can be confusing. When buying toothpaste for your child, look for one that contains fluoride and tastes good. Some toothpastes also are approved by the American Dental Association (ADA). The ADA Seal of Acceptance means that the manufacturer has provided data proving that the toothpaste is safe and effective. Some manufacturers choose not to seek the ADA seal of approval. So, toothpastes without the ADA seal also may be safe and work well, but their performance has not been evaluated by the ADA.

Children only need a small pea-size amount of toothpaste on their toothbrushes. Be sure your child understands that toothpaste is not food. It needs to be spit out, not swallowed.


Toothbrushes

The type of toothbrush your child uses is important because the wrong kind can be damaging to soft tissues. Regardless of your child's age, his or her toothbrush should have soft nylon bristles. Harder bristles can cause gums to wear away over time. When your child is an infant, the toothbrush should be very small. As he or she grows, select small toothbrushes that can fit easily in the mouth and brush one or two teeth at a time. Your child's toothbrush should be able to reach all the teeth, including the molars in the very back.

Replace toothbrushes about every four months or when they begin to look worn and frayed. If a toothbrush wears out much sooner than three or four months, you or your child may be using too much pressure. It's also a good idea to replace brushes after your child has had a cold or other illness to prevent reinfection.

Powered toothbrushes are fun and may remove more plaque and stain than regular toothbrushes. That doesn't mean you should run out and buy one. Regular toothbrushes are very effective, too. However, because they make brushing easier, powered toothbrushes can be helpful for special needs children who can't sit still long enough to properly brush their teeth with a regular toothbrush.


Water Irrigation Devices

These appliances usually are not necessary, but they may benefit some children with braces or other type of orthodontics who need help getting food from between teeth. However, these devices do not remove plaque that is firmly attached to the tooth. That still needs to be done with a toothbrush.


Mouthwashes And Fluoride Mouth Rinses

Mouthwash and fluoride mouth rinse are two different products. Mouthwash freshens breath, but does nothing to clean teeth. Most mouthwashes contain alcohol and are not appropriate for children younger than 6 years old. This is because young children can easily swallow the mouthwash. If your child has chronic bad breath, he or she should see a doctor. It could be caused by a health problem.

Fluoride mouth rinse coats teeth with fluoride, which helps to prevent cavities. You should check with your child's dentist or dental hygienist to determine if your child needs to use a fluoride mouth rinse. It is typically used once or twice a day by children who are cavity prone, even if the child has only one area of decay. Children as young as 7 years old can use a fluoride rinse, if they know how to spit out a liquid without swallowing it. You can test your child to see if he or she is ready. Give him or her a half-cup of water. Ask your child to put some of the water in his or her mouth, swish it around and spit it out into a second cup. If there is a half cup of water in the second cup, your child probably can spit out the mouth rinse. You should still supervise your child to make sure the rinse does not get swallowed.

For more information about your kids' oral health, please contact our Federal Way dentist, Dr. Kenneth Brossel today!


List of Articles

Keys to Controlling Bad Breath file

  • Aug 02, 2017

If you’re serious about learning what’s causing your bad breath, consider scheduling an appointment with your dental professional. Given your full medical and dental history along with an oral examination, your dentist should be able to identify the culprit. The causes of bad breath are numerous and include certain foods, alcohol or cigarettes, poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, diabetes, dry mouth, sinus or throat infections, lung infections or abscesses, kidney/liver failure, gastrointest...
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Injured Tooth file

  • Jun 27, 2017

How Do I Know if I Need Treatment? As with any trauma to the mouth, you should consult with your dentist immediately to determine if treatment is required. The dentist will examine the affected area and may take X-rays. If you are in pain from a broken, cracked or chipped tooth, you may want to take an over-the-counter pain reliever. If possible, keep any part of the tooth that has broken off and take this with you to the dentist. If a tooth is completely knocked out of the mouth by an injury,...
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Periodontal Disease: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You file

  • Jun 08, 2017

It is estimated that 35.7 million Americans are living with a bacterial infection of the gums known as periodontal disease. This infection attacks the tissue that keeps your teeth attached to your gums. On average, more than 500 species of bacteria live in your mouth.2 Some of these bacteria are beneficial, while others under the right conditions can cause disease. Living a healthy lifestyle helps you keep the harmful bacteria under control. Not taking care of your overall health and your te...
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Maximize Plaque Bacteria Removal Between Teeth file

  • May 08, 2017

It's important that you maximize plaque removal every day through effective tooth brushing and flossing. You must thoroughly clean around both teeth and implants. The best way to clean your implant depends on the stage of your treatment, so you should always ask your Federal Way dentist for advice about this. Immediately following surgical placement of the implant, the wound is often sensitive, so you may not be able to use a toothbrush in that part of your mouth. You can prevent plaque build...
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Diastemas and the Treatment Options file

  • Mar 06, 2017

What is a Diastema and How do I Treat It? A diastema is an area of extra space between two or more teeth. The two front teeth of the upper jaw area is where diastema is most frequently seen. Many children experience diastema as primary teeth fall out, though in most cases these spaces close when the permanent teeth erupt. Diastemas may also be caused by a tooth size discrepancy, missing teeth or an oversized labial frenum, the tissue that extends from the inside of the lip to the gum tiss...
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The Important Reasons for Mouth Guards file

  • Jan 23, 2017

A mouth guard is a soft plastic or laminate device used in sports to prevent oral injuries to the teeth, mouth, cheeks, tongue and jaw. The American Dental Association projects that one third of all dental injuries are sports related. The use of a mouth guard can prevent more than 200,000 oral injuries to the mouth each year. The types of dental injuries that can occur without the use of a mouth guard are chipped or broken teeth, fractured crowns or bridgework, lip and cheek injuries, roo...
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What You Need to Know About Dry Mouth file

  • Dec 07, 2016

Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while — if they are nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to serious health problems. Dry mouth can Cause difficulties in tasting, chewing, swallowing, and speaking Increase your chance of developing dental decay and other infections in the mouth Be a sign of certain diseases and conditions Be caused by certain medications or medical treatments Dry mouth is not...
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Treatment Options for Diastema file

  • Oct 12, 2016

What is a Diastema and How do I Treat It?A diastema is an area of extra space between two or more teeth. The two front teeth of the upper jaw area is where diastema is most frequently seen. Many children experience diastema as primary teeth fall out, though in most cases these spaces close when the permanent teeth erupt. Diastemas may also be caused by a tooth size discrepancy, missing teeth or an oversized labial frenum, the tissue that extends from the inside of the lip to the gum tissue where...
Read more

Kids Toothpaste, Toothbrushes, and More file

  • Jun 21, 2016

Toothpastes So many toothpastes are on the market today, choosing one can be confusing. When buying toothpaste for your child, look for one that contains fluoride and tastes good. Some toothpastes also are approved by the American Dental Association (ADA). The ADA Seal of Acceptance means that the manufacturer has provided data proving that the toothpaste is safe and effective. Some manufacturers choose not to seek the ADA seal of approval. So, toothpastes without the ADA seal also may b...
Read more

Importance of Childhood Oral Hygiene & the Role of Parents file

  • Jun 01, 2016

Importance of the primary dentition Primary teeth start to erupt in children from the age of six months. The primary dentition is complete by approximately two and a half years of age. The enamel of primary teeth is less densely mineralized than the enamel of permanent teeth, making them particularly susceptible to caries. Primary teeth are essential tools, both for chewing and learning to talk. They help to break up food into small pieces, thereby ensuring efficient digestion. A full set of ...
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Dr. Brossel is fantastic! I have always avoided going to the dentist at all costs, but immediately upon walking into their office I felt comfortable and at ease. His staff are all very sweet and helpful too. If you are in the market for a new Dentist, I would absolutely recommend Dr. Brossel and his team!

Rachel S. on Yelp

Dr. Brossel is quick ! staff super friendly and you get what you pay for. It is a lil pricey i would suggest having a dental plan / insurance before getting anything done to help with pay but the results are worth it.

Sarah Y. on Yelp

My experience with Dr. Brossel and his staff was amazing. I highly recommend him. I see why he keeps being voted the best dentist in Federal Way.

Yvonne R. on Yelp

Dr. Brossel and the hygienists have a high quality of patient care, and they always have a smile. The front office staff is great at scheduling and dealing with insurance issues.

Mitchell C. on Google

Most certainly the best dentist I have had yet! Kenneth Brossel and his staff are very professional, highly knowledgeable, thoroughly precise, and better yet work in a speedy organized fashion.

Dennis S. on Google

have been going to Dr Brossel for almost 30 years, and the people are wonderful!

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The contents of this website, such as text, videos, images and other material are intended for informational and educational purposes only and not for the purpose of rendering medical advice. Please contact our Federal Way dentist, Dr. Kenneth Brossel for any additional information on implants, crowns, bridges, dentures, root canals, and more. For questions, please call (253) 925-2171.